The Darling Nomadess: 5 Tips for Landing the Job After (or During!) College

Thursday, August 21, 2014

5 Tips for Landing the Job After (or During!) College

Something completely exciting is happening today, Darlings! Today, I am moving to Sandusky to start a job at a hotel in Cedar Point! For the next 10 weeks, I'll be working for reservations and as a front desk clerk. I'm so excited for this opportunity and hope that it helps me save money so I can start traveling by January! While I've finally landed a job and am moving (again…I told you, I'm a nomad), one of my blogging friends Jenn from Hellorigby! will be sharing her expertise in how to land your job!

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Hi The Darling Daily readers! I'm Jenn, and I blog over at hellorigby! It happens to be named after my cute dog, Rigby, and I share some of his antics and bits and pieces of our life in Seattle. You can also look forward to seeing fashion, beauty, and what I'm reading too!

If you recognize me, you may already know that I'm no longer a college student. But just a few years ago, I was graduating and job hunting, and it made me crazy. I mean, it's really not a pleasant process. You get rejected, or you just never hear back. No one likes that, right? So I thought I'd share with you how I landed a career job just a week after I graduated from my university. If I can do it, so can you!

5 Tips for Landing the Job After College / hellorigby!

1. Network.

I know, I know, you've heard this one before. But bear with me, networking is how I landed my job. I think the key to landing a great job is to intern. I had an internship in college, and not only did I learn a ton, the connections I made there ended up networking beyond the halls of my university. The key to networking is to show interest, show passion, but most importantly listen and connect.

2. Have a killer resume.

Your resume should be flawless. Have plenty of people pour over your resume, there should be no grammatical or spelling mistakes. If you're going into a creative field, I highly recommend going outside of the box of Word and creating your own custom resume. Mine is simple, but with a pop of color and some visual interest to divide my work experience, education, and skills.

3. Be honest during interviews.

I've interviewed a lot of candidates and I can tell when you're lying, so stop it. If you don't know something about what the interviewer is asking, just say so. I usually follow with "I've never used that program, but I've heard of it and have always wanted to learn!" Usually they're open to suggestions, so you can always counter with, "while I don't have that skill, I am familiar with..." and share something relevant about your background.

4. Be selective.

Don't apply everywhere that's possibly hiring someone with maybe one of your qualifications! I made this mistake and spent an entire weekend (seriously, from morning until late at night) applying for jobs. I got one call back. From a recruiting firm. With no interest in actually placing me. Seriously, don't bother. Find places that you'd love to work, find the name of someone with your desired job description, and send them an email. Don't get me wrong, if they have a job description posted and you fit the qualifications, go for it, but personalization and genuine interest goes a long way.

5. Take the first job, but keep your eyes open.

If the job market is tough in your area, take the first job you can land. But don't stop looking. Keep your resume out there, apply to jobs that you'd love (just not every.single.one... and if you don't know why, read #4 again!) and get involved in networking events in your area. Meetup.com has been a great source of professional events for me, as well as local universities and their blogs.

Obviously finding the perfect job will take a little time, and don't be too discouraged if the first few (or many) don't work out. I promise there's a great job waiting for you out there!


Are you on the job hunt? Do you have any advice for those looking for a job, or do you need some advice yourself? I'd love to hear all about it in the comments!



Follow Jenn: bloglovin / twitter / instagram / pinterest / g+

23 comments:

  1. These are excellent tips!! I had a few friends that graduated this past spring from college, and it was interesting for me to watch them go through their job search process. Most of them have found jobs by now that they're enjoying so far, but they didn't get those without a lot of hard work and dedication!

    So excited for you to be starting your new job! Working in the tourism and hospitality industry was always something I have thought about doing as a back-up plan if I end up choosing not to work in radio for some reason. :-) (I've always thought working in travel was a really fun field too!) Keep us updated on how the new job is going and also on your plans for winter!!!

    xoxo A
    www.southernbelleintraining.com

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    1. Job hunting is a ton of work! It definitely can be a like a full time job on its own. Great to hear that they've found some great jobs!

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  2. I took the very first job out of college that I was offered. It wasn't ideal and looking back, I pretty much disliked it from the get go BUT I was able to build my resume, made connections and survive on my own for the first time. It truly was the stepping stone to an awesome career.

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    1. Oh that's great to hear! It definitely can be a bummer taking a not so great job, but like you said, it does often lead to bigger and better things!

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  3. Those were definitely super important things to know. I had my resume professionally done, and it was the best thing I could have done. It was money well spent, because I had no clue what I was doing.

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    1. That's a great idea! I've had friends do the same and they said it made a huge difference in their job hunt.

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  4. I work in pre-employment vetting and one thing I would add is read the instructions carefully on your application form/job advert. I barely get one application EVER that is filled in completely correctly with the correct proof of ID etc. provided. It is really shocking how bad some of them are. As an employer I find that it smacks of not being bothered and lack of attention to detail, neither of which are qualities that I would want in an employee!

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    1. Oh that's a good one! We don't have quite the same application process, but we often have people applying for jobs with zero of the required skills or are really trying to apply for a completely different position. So frustrating!

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  5. Did you use linkedin during your job hunt?

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  6. Great tips and not just for those right out of college, but for anyone looking for a job or just a change.

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    1. Very true! These are always valid tips, but ones I wish someone had told me when I was getting ready to graduate! :)

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  7. Thank you for sharing! These are some really great tips. Job hunting can be so agonizing.

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  8. great tips, especially the network one! that's what's gotten me almost every job I've had!

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    1. Thanks Vett! Glad you had a similar experience.

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  9. Networking is really the best tip. That is what has helped me most. And then I use my work ethic to work my way up

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    1. Agreed, Aleshea. Making personal connections has always worked out the best for me.

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  10. Love all the tips! Number 5 I think is pretty important. Sometimes we turn down jobs because they're not our dream job then we wait months before finding something than we like less than the first offer! www.redeemingtheday.com

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    1. Great point, Molly! I think its better to have a job rather than nothing at all. It also makes you look better to hiring managers and potential employers!

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  11. Just found this post! Great tips, Jenn!
    I'm currently on the job hunt now, but I would also add keeping busy to this list. I volunteer at a local nonprofit currently doing their social media. It's not what I want to do, but it keeps me busy, and it looks better to employers knowing that you're doing SOMETHING rather than NOTHING even if you are unemployed.

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    1. Oh that is a great idea! Definitely agree - volunteering looks great on a resume!

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Hey there, Darling! I love hearing from my lovely readers! Leave a comment below or email me at darlingprepster@gmail.com! XOXO